Difference between Ubuntu Hardy 8.04 and Ubuntu Lucid 10.04

When it comes to upgrading Ubuntu, people often question what are the differences.  Furthermore, people often will question if it is worth upgrading.

Fortunately, I will explain the differences for those that are curious.

When it comes to installing packages, going online and downloading the latest and greatest program such as OpenOffice from the Internet for Ubuntu is often a daunting task.  Therefore, it is always recommended to use the packages that are already distributed with that version of Ubuntu even if it is not the latest version.

I have tried downloading and installing a program for Ubuntu only to find out that I needed to download and install various other packages that are required for it to work.  Not only that, in some cases, the version of the packages that are shipped with that version of Ubuntu is too old and needs to be upgraded by downloading directly from the developers website.  Therefore, installing the latest and greatest program can take many hours.  Furthermore, there is no guarantee that it will work.

Hardy and Lucid are the same way.  Hardy will use version 2.0 of some specific program while Lucid will use version 3.0 of the same program.  Furthermore, Lucid uses a newer kernel that will support hardware previously not available in Hardy.  Some programs also will be removed or added in newer versions.  For example, Hardy uses Pidgin Instant Messenger while Lucid uses Empathy Instant Messenger instead.

NOTE:  The kernel used in both Hardy and Jaunty are both 2.6 versions.  Looking at the Linux kernel website at http://www.kernel.org/, 2.6.34 is the latest stable version available as of June 29, 2010.  Both Hardy and Jaunty uses the same kernel because they both use version 2.6, but Jaunty may use a more recent version that supports more hardware.

Linux Kernel version 2.6.0 came out sometime in 2003 while Linux Kernel version 2.4.0 came out sometime in 2001.   Linux Kernel version 2.4 is also constantly updated with the latest version out on Feb 1, 2010 called 2.4.37.9.  Doing a Google search for 2.4 2.6 difference will provide many answers why there are currently two versions available.

Therefore, upgrading is not necessary.  Since Ubuntu Hardy and Ubuntu Lucid are LTS versions, they will be supported for 3 years for the desktop version and 5 years for the server version (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LTS).

The reasons I can see for someone wanting to upgrade to Ubuntu Lucid 10.04 is:

  • To use the latest software available for the latest Ubuntu LTS version.
  • To get newer hardware working that may not have worked on previous Ubuntu versions.
  • To see if issues with software and/or hardware in Hardy are still present in Lucid.

There are probably many more reasons, but if Hardy works fine on your computer, stick with it until April 2011 for the desktop version and April 2013 for the server version.  Ubuntu Hardy support will end then, and one will have to install Ubuntu Lucid to receive updates.

OpenOffice shipped with both Ubuntu Hardy and Ubuntu Lucid are shown below.  Lucid uses a newer OpenOffice version.

http://packages.ubuntu.com/hardy/openoffice.org

http://packages.ubuntu.com/lucid/openoffice.org

Upgrading vs Fresh install

Strangely enough, it seems that when one does a fresh install, the grub boot menu is stored in a file called grub.cfg.  When one does an upgrade, one may find that the grub boot menu is stored in a file called menu.lst.  Furthermore, many may find that upgrading Ubuntu 10.04 will result in the kernel not being upgraded.

There is a solution that may work.

One will notice that /boot contains a bunch of files as shown above.  These are the kernels that are currently available for your Ubuntu 10.04 system.  In some cases, the boot menu will not list the latest kernel available. In this case, the latest kernel version is 2.6.32-23.  Therefore, in order to use the latest kernel version when the GRUB menu does not make it available, one will have to add it.

Those that have a grub.cfg file in /boot/grub, copy and paste the menuentry that is currently being booted from below the closing brace }.  After copying and pasting, change all the copy and pasted 2.6.32-22 to 2.6.32-23.  An example is shown below.

menuentry ‘Ubuntu, with Linux 2.6.32-22-generic’ –class ubuntu –class gnu-linux –class gnu –class os {
recordfail
insmod ext2
set root='(hd0,6)’
search –no-floppy –fs-uuid –set 90b37c66-049f-4a43-80fd-18b6261b269e
linux    /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-22-generic root=UUID=90b37c66-049f-4a43-80fd-18b6261b269e ro   quiet splash
initrd    /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-22-generic
}
menuentry ‘Ubuntu, with Linux 2.6.32-22-generic (recovery mode)’ –class ubuntu –class gnu-linux –class gnu –class os {
recordfail
insmod ext2
set root='(hd0,6)’
search –no-floppy –fs-uuid –set 90b37c66-049f-4a43-80fd-18b6261b269e
echo    ‘Loading Linux 2.6.32-22-generic …’
linux    /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-22-generic root=UUID=90b37c66-049f-4a43-80fd-18b6261b269e ro single
echo    ‘Loading initial ramdisk …’
initrd    /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-22-generic
}

menuentry ‘Ubuntu, with Linux 2.6.32-23-generic’ –class ubuntu –class gnu-linux –class gnu –class os {
recordfail
insmod ext2
set root='(hd0,6)’
search –no-floppy –fs-uuid –set 90b37c66-049f-4a43-80fd-18b6261b269e
linux    /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-23-generic root=UUID=90b37c66-049f-4a43-80fd-18b6261b269e ro   quiet splash
initrd    /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-23-generic
}
menuentry ‘Ubuntu, with Linux 2.6.32-23-generic (recovery mode)’ –class ubuntu –class gnu-linux –class gnu –class os {
recordfail
insmod ext2
set root='(hd0,6)’
search –no-floppy –fs-uuid –set 90b37c66-049f-4a43-80fd-18b6261b269e
echo    ‘Loading Linux 2.6.32-23-generic …’
linux    /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-23-generic root=UUID=90b37c66-049f-4a43-80fd-18b6261b269e ro single
echo    ‘Loading initial ramdisk …’
initrd    /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-23-generic
}

For those that have menu.lst in /boot/grub, copy and paste the title, root, kernel, initrd, and quiet if included that is currently being booted from below.  After copying and pasting, change all the copy and pasted 2.6.32-22 to 2.6.32-23.  An example is shown below.

title        Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, kernel 2.6.32-22-generic
root        (hd0,8)
kernel        /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-22-generic root=UUID=748059b1-aaed-47bd-a36f-8160e2fabf68 ro quiet splash
initrd        /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-22-generic
quiet

title        Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, kernel 2.6.32-22-generic (recovery mode)
root        (hd0,8)
kernel        /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-22-generic root=UUID=748059b1-aaed-47bd-a36f-8160e2fabf68 ro  single
initrd        /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-22-generic

title        Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, kernel 2.6.32-23-generic
root        (hd0,8)
kernel        /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-23-generic root=UUID=748059b1-aaed-47bd-a36f-8160e2fabf68 ro quiet splash
initrd        /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-23-generic
quiet

title        Ubuntu 10.04 LTS, kernel 2.6.32-23-generic (recovery mode)
root        (hd0,8)
kernel        /boot/vmlinuz-2.6.32-23-generic root=UUID=748059b1-aaed-47bd-a36f-8160e2fabf68 ro  single
initrd        /boot/initrd.img-2.6.32-23-generic

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